The traditional “Cruck” frame has been in use for many hundreds if not thousands of years but was very popular in medieval times.

As a structural building style it is recognisable as quintessentially traditional English, rustic architecture but these structures trace their origins back to boat building.

Turn a Cruck frame over and you have a structure that is similar in principle and practice, to a boat so the whole building style probably evolved from using unseaworthy boats as roofs for buildings.

The appeal of these buildings stems from their strength but also because they represent one of the simplest ways to build a structure. Then there is the fact that everything is on show so you can almost see the various components either in compression or tension so working with AND against each other in dynamic tension. If you would like a quote for a frame or a finished building , send an email outlining your project.

The simplicity of the Cruck comes from the building methods and it is those traditional methods that we focus on in our timber framing workshops. At the end of a one day workshop, you could design and build a simple structure with some beams, a hammer, a chisel and a saw. The only thing that modern machinery brings to the job is timesaving.  Surprisingly, we have evolved the traditional Cruck so that it can more easily incorporate modern building components but I will reveal more to people on the next timber framing workshops.

See also :- 

www.Arbornauts.com   for Tree Surgery and Arboriculture

www.TreeAdvice.com    for professional Tree Consultancy

The Yew tree that was featured in Cheshire Life back in 2001 has been cut and is now being offered for sale. You can see images at www.craftwoods.co.uk/Raw_Timber/Planks/ and a copy of the article can be found at www.craftwoods.co.uk/downloads/Twk10a.pdf

                                                                                 

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